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Martin Genzel

Project member of CH2

TU Berlin Institut für Mathematik
Straße des 17. Juni 136
10623, Berlin
+49 (0) 30 03031473616
genzel@math.tu-berlin.de
Website


Research focus

High-dimensional data analysis
Compressed Sensing
Statistical learning

Projects as a member

  • CH2

    Sparse compressed sensing based classifiers for -omics mass-data

    Prof. Dr. Tim Conrad / Prof. Dr. Gitta Kutyniok / Prof. Dr. Christof Schütte

    Project heads: Prof. Dr. Tim Conrad / Prof. Dr. Gitta Kutyniok / Prof. Dr. Christof Schütte
    Project members: Nada Cvetkovic / Martin Genzel
    Duration: -
    Status: completed
    Located at: Freie Universität Berlin / Technische Universität Berlin

    Description

    Tumor diseases rank among the most frequent causes of death in Western countries coinciding with an incomplete understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms and a lack of individual treatment options. Hence, early diagnosis of the disease and early relapse monitoring are currently the best available options to improve patient survival. In this project, we aim for the identification of disease specific sets of biological signals that reliably indicate a disease outbreak (or status) in an individual. Such biological signals (e.g. proteomics or genomics data) are typically very large (millions of dimensions), which significantly increases the complexity of algorithms for analyzing the parameter space or makes them even infeasible. However, these types of data usually exhibit a very particular structure, and at the same time, the set of disease specific features is very small compared to the ambient dimension. Such a high-dimensional setting naturally calls for the application of the concept of sparse classifiers, which has been extensively studied in the fields of compressed sensing and statistical learning during the last decade. Our research focuses on both algorithmic improvements of available methods as well as theoretical results such as recovery guarantees for general data models.

    http://medicalbioinformatics.de/research/projects/ecmath-ch2

Projects as a guest